Tata starbucks, Kelloggs, McCain fail to get FSSAI approval – FSSAI Regn. Blog News

FSSAI rejects appoval Tata-Starbucks

The Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) has rejected product approval applications of Tata Starbucks, Kellogg’s and McCain due to lack of sufficient supporting documents for safety assessment, the Rajya Sabha was informed on Thursday. While 34 products of Tata Starbucks have been rejected which included honey vanilla flavoured syrup, sea salt and red bean sauce, two products of Kelloggs including Kellogg’s special K Red Berries and Kellogg’s special K Oats and Honey have been rejected.

FSSAI Approval rejected due to lack of supporting documents

“FSSAI has rejected product approval applications of Tata Starbucks, Kellogg and McCain due to lack of sufficient supporting documents for safety/risk assessment,” Minister of state for Health Shripad Naik said. The only product of McCain Foods India which was rejected was McCain Battered Pepper and Cheese Bites.

FSSAI

The Minister said that the primary responsibility of FSSAI is to lay down science based food standards, make regulations, regulate imports and undertake coordination with states and UTs on food safety. The implementation and enforcement of the Food Safety and Standards (FSS) Act 2006 largely rests with states and Union Territories. Random inspections of premises and sampling of food items are done by officials of the food safety departments of the respective states and UTs to ensure compliance of the FSS Act 2006, Rules and Regulations. “In cases where samples are found to be non-compliant, action is taken as per provisions of the FSS Act 2006 by the state authorities or the FSSAI,” Naik added.

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No definition for junk food under FSS act, 2006

Junk food not definedJunk food

Junk Food has not been defined under the Food Safety and Standards (FSS) Act, 2006.

At present, there is no proposal under consideration of the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare to define junk food under the FSS Act. However, guidelines for making available Wholesome, Nutritious, Safe and Hygienic Food to School children in the country have been framed by the Central Advisory Committee, FSSAI.

Study on junk food

The National Institute of Nutrition (NIN), ICMR has not conducted a study on junk food. A study had, however, been conducted by NIN to assess ill-effects of consumption of Carbonated Water beverages (CWBs) on the health of adolescents and young Adults, which showed higher increments of body fat in young consumers.

Food safety

The consumers are educated/made aware of the food safety through consumer awareness programmes launched jointly by the Department of Consumer Affairs and the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI). These include advertisements in different media, campaigns launched by the FSSAI on social media such as Face-book, documentary films on YouTube, educational booklets, information on FSSAI website, stalls at Fairs/Melas/Events and mass awareness campaigns.

The MoS, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Shri Shripad Yesso Naik stated this in a written reply in the Rajya Sabha here today.

Freezing offers easier, less risky method of preserving seasonal goodness

Freezing offers easier, less risky method of preservingFood

Are zucchini starting to pile up? Tomatoes multiplying daily? Maybe you want to sock away some fresh sweet corn to enjoy at Thanksgiving dinner?You don’t need Mason jars, lids with rings and an expensive canner to preserve the summer bounty; all you need is freezer space.“Freezing is a great option,” said Linnette Goard, a food-safety specialist and an emeritus faculty member with Ohio State University Extension.Given the Lancaster botulism outbreak linked to home-canned potatoes earlier this year, cooks might approach canning with a bit of consternation.But freezing, experts say, is a worry-free option for food preservation.

Effect of Freezing on microbes

“Freezing removes the issue of harmfulness,” said Jessica Piper, spokeswoman for Jarden Home Brands of Indianapolis, which makes Ball and Kerr canning supplies.Freezing preserves food for later use, said Shari Gallup, a family and consumer-sciences educator for OSU Extension in Licking County, and eliminates the concern of bacterial contamination because most frozen produce will be cooked or heated before being eaten.Freezing doesn’t destroy bacteria on produce, but it does slow its growth, she said, emphasizing the importance of safe thawing and proper cooking afterward.Foods should be thawed in a refrigerator, Gallup said — not on a countertop at room temperature where bacteria can grow rapidly.

How to freeze food?

And the freezing process should begin with clean food and utensils: “Most vegetables grow on the ground, so washing is very important,” she said.Produce should be frozen at peak ripeness, preferably on the day it is picked or bought, to ensure freshness and preserve nutrients, Gallup said.

FBOs have to test food products for chemicals, contaminants to ensure safety

Friday, July 31, 2015 08:00 IST
Our Bureau, New Delhi

As per the conditions of licence prescribed in the Food Safety and Standards (Licensing and Registration of Food Businesses) Regulations, 2011, all food business operators have to ensure testing of relevant chemicals and/or microbiological contaminants in food products in accordance with these regulations as frequently as required on the basis of historical data and risk assessment to ensure production and delivery of safe food through own or NABL-accredited /Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI)-notified labs at least once in six months. Minister of state for health and family welfare Shripad Yesso Naik stated this in a written reply in the Rajya Sabha on Thursday.

Every FBO in the country has to follow and comply with Food Safety and Standards Act, 2006, and rules and regulations made thereunder. Besides, safety standards of food items have been notified in respect of around 365 categories of food products. These standards are enforced by the food safety departments of the states/UTs.

 

Just 5% rise in licensing and registration since last deadline extension

Friday, July 31, 2015 08:00 IST
Ashwani Maindola and Harcha Bhaskar

Even as August 4, 2015, the deadline for obtaining licence or securing registration by FBOs (food business operators) under Food Safety and Standards (Licensing and Registration of Food Business) Regulations, 2011,is round the corner, there has been just five per cent increase in the figures recorded six months ago.

While last January, former FSSAI chairman K Chandramouli had stated while speaking at Chennai that about 30 lakh FBOs had either obtained licence or secured registration till that time, six months since then, on June 29, 2015, as per a source in FSSAI, “A total of 20,850 Central and 5, 87,929 state licences have been issued. Further, a total of 25,02,867 FBOs have been registered by the states/ UTs under Food Safety and Standards Act, 2006.” Thus, at the end of the month of June, the total number of licensing and registration recorded int he country stood at around 31.25 lakh – an increase of just 1.25 lakh.

Later in a telephonic conversation with F&B News, the source pointed out that in case of online licensing and registration, “Till July 28, 2015, the body has done 21,344 Central licences and 2, 05,791 state licences. In case of registration – 11, 56, 449 FBOs registered.”

Actually, the pace seem to have been sluggish all along. For example, by April 6, 2015, FSSAI had granted 19,365 Central licences while the states/UTs granted 5,52,411 licences and registered 23,80,092 FBOs, according to a newsletter of FSSAI which was published in May. Further, by February 20, 2015, FSSAI had granted 18,736 Central licences while states/UTs granted 5,50,808 licences and registered 23,73,484 FBOs.

While it is visibly clear that the increase is minuscule, what is disturbing is the fact that the very purpose of an extension of six months is defeated when hardly much is achieved in terms of improvement in figures.In fact, the entire licensing and registration exercise, which has been in progress since 2011,has not been fruitful as out of some 5 crore odd FBOs in the country, hardly 32 lakh have either obtained licence or secured registration.

Nevertheless, FSSAI seems to be happy with its feat as during the CAC meeting in January, FSSAI CEO Y S Malik appreciated the states and UTs for their efforts towards enforcement of the Act. He noted the achievements on registration of FBOs and grant of licences – 30 lakh in a span of three years.

Industry wants another extension

Meanwhile, industry associations such as CAIT (Confederation of All India Traders) and Karaikudi Bakery Owners Association have started making representations and staging demonstrations in support of another extension so as to complete the review of FSSR and remove all the defects, shortcomings and ambiguities.

Praveen Khandelwal, secretary, CAIT,  stated “ On behalf of the industry we would soon have a meeting with the health minister asking for an extension of at least six months to the deadline.” He added, “Last time there was a committee constituted for the amendment of the Act. But due to some reason, there has been no amendment. So we want the government to first constitute a joint committee wherein both government officers and stakeholders work together  on the necessary amendment. We support strict legislation but it should be based on ground reality.” According to him, the possible reason for poor response to registration and slow progress is that people lack trust in the legislation and lack of awareness.

R Kaleeswaran, honorary secretary, Karaikudi Bakery Owners Association, in a letter to union health minister J P Nadda, has pointed out, “Review of FSSA and FSSR being undertaken by Committee of 31 MPs under chairmanship of SC Mishra; Comprehensive Review Committee of 16 Members; and Working Groups of the Food Authority,needs to be completed at the earliest so as to remove all the defects and shortcomings in the regulations.”

Hence, he adds, “Another deadline extension should be given and on removal of the defects and shortcomings, the licensing and registration of FBOs can be completed at a fast pace.”
However, authorities at the FDA and FDCA level do not seem to agree. A senior official from state of Tamil Nadu admitted, “The whole process is a dampener as every time the deadline gets extended.” In fact, most officials at the state level feel that it is because of the numerous extensions that people are not serious about completing the procedure at the earliest.

But the industry insists that the slow pace of licensing and registration is more because of “confusion” than any other reason. According to an industry insider, the primary objective of FSSAI was to convert the previous PFA licences into new ones under FSS Act. But still there is no data showing as to how many conversions have taken place in the last four years. Further, many licences under PFA have expired and they need to be renewed but there is no deadline for this renewal. It is such ambiguities that are making things complicated.

Compulsory Testing of Packaged Food Products

Press Information Bureau
Government of India
Ministry of Health and Family Welfare
30-July-2015 14:25 IST
Compulsory Testing of Packaged Food Products

As per the conditions of license prescribed in the Food Safety and Standards (Licensing and Registration of Food Businesses) Regulation, 2011, all food business operators have to ensure testing of relevant chemical and/or microbiological contaminants in food products in accordance with these regulations as frequently as required on the basis of historical data and risk assessment to ensure production and delivery of safe food through own or NABL accredited /Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) notified labs at least once in six months. Every food business operator in the country has to follow and comply with Food Safety and Standards Act, 2006, Rules and Regulations made there under.

Besides, safety standards of food items have been notified in respect of around 365 categories of food products. These standards are enforced by the Food Safety Departments of the States/UTs.

The MoS, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Shri Shripad Yesso Naik stated this in a written reply in the Rajya Sabha here today.

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MV/BK

Mechanism to Check Pesticides in Food Items

Press Information Bureau
Government of India
Ministry of Health and Family Welfare
30-July-2015 14:20 IST

Mechanism to Check Pesticides in Food Items

 

The standards for pesticides in food products, potable water and fruits have been prescribed under the Food Safety and Standards (Contaminants, Toxins and Residues) Regulations, 2011.  The States/UTs which are responsible for enforcement of the Act draw samples and take action as per laid down procedures to ensure conformance with the standards.

The details of laboratories approved/authorized by the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India are indicated below:-

State – wise list of Food Testing Laboratories

 

Sr. No. State/UT Number of State/ Public Food Laboratories Number of Referral Food Labs* Number of NABL Accredited Private Labs notified by FSSAI
1. Andaman and Nicobar Islands 1
2. Andhra Pradesh 1 1
3. Assam 1
4. Bihar 1
5. Chhattisgarh 1
6. Daman and Diu 1
7. NCT of Delhi 1 11
8. Goa 1
9. Gujarat 6 1 3
10. Haryana 2 8
11. Himachal Pradesh 1
12. Jammu and Kashmir 2
13. Jharkhand 1
14. Karnataka 4 2 7
15. Kerala 3 1 5
16. Madhya Pradesh 3 3
17. Maharashtra 11 2 18
18. Meghalaya 1
19. Nagaland 1
20. Odisha 1
21. Puducherry 1
22. Punjab 3 2
23. Rajasthan 8 3
24. Tamil Nadu 7 1 7
25. Telangana 1 1 5
26. Tripura 1
27. Uttar Pradesh 3 2 3
28. Uttarakhand 1
29. West Bengal 5 1 5
  Total 72 12 82

 

*The Referral Food Laboratories work as appellate laboratories for the purpose of analysis of appeal samples of food lifted by the Food Safety Officers of the State/UTs and local bodies and the imported food samples.

 

The MoS, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Shri Shripad Yesso Naik stated this in a written reply in the Rajya Sabha here today.

 

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MV/BK