Top Queries on FSSAI Licensing/Registration answered by FoodSafetyHelpline

Top Queries on FSSAI Licensing/Registration answered by FoodSafetyHelpline

FoodSafetyHelpline replied to the following recent queries:

Question: Is it necessary to get license to sell homemade baby food? These porridge powders for babies are manufactured by my parents and sold locally from generations. Now I want to start it online and need your advice.

Kindly guide me if it is necessary to get license. If so, as these are prepared at our home kitchen, what are the conditions expected for the license? Can we get it for the address of our rented house?

Answer: Yes, you need to apply for the license/registration of your food business as you are very well under the ambit of food Safety & Standards Act, 2006. For manufacturing/processing capacity is upto 100 ltr/kg per day then you need to apply for the registration certificate and if it is more than 100ltr/kg then you have to apply for the license under the FSS Act. You can show the rented premises as your food business location. The manufacturing/processing area should be ideally located from any external influence besides maintaining the sanitary & hygienic conditions. The food manufacturing/processing are should be dedicatedly allocated for the particular food activity which we believer would not be possible in a home kitchen.

Now, there is an online procedure for license/registration. Click here to read more.

Once you obtain a registration certificate then you have to follow the FSSAI guidelines on the sanitary & hygienic conditions as stated in Schedule 4. You also have to follow the FSS (Packaging & Labelling) Regulations 2011. And most important; you need to check for the list of ingredients and the formulation of the baby food, to verify that you are conforming with the standards as defined under FSS (Food Products Standards & Food Additives) Regulations, 2011.

Question: I am going to start a food product business in ghaziabad which we sell through hawkers like sanitized quality walls ice cream cycle riksha, so please guide me how to take licence in gaziabad & to whom I have to contact.

Answer: FSSAI had introduced an online procedure for applying for the license and you can apply through online. Your can apply online: FSSAI licensing & Registration

Question: Why we need product approval? When we need product approval?

Answer: Please go through the following link for video recording: Food Product Approval

Question: If we make homemade jams and pickles in small quantities to sell, we only need a registration it seems – can this be done online or is a trip to the state/regional authority still necessary. Also how long does it take to get the registration certificate?

Answer: You can apply online for license/registration of your food business as there is an online procedure by FSSAI for the same. Whether you need registration or a license would depend upon the production capacity of your manufacturing unit. If your production capacity is upto 100 ltr/kg per day, then you need registration certificate and if your annual turnover is more than 100 ltr/kg per day then you will have to apply for the license. You can read more for the information on registration & licensing in the following urls:

India to get own version of class action lawsuits

TNN | May 21, 2015, 01.43 AM IST

NEW DELHI: India is set to have a stronger consumer protection law with its own version of class action suits. As the term is usually defined, a class action suit is one in which one or several persons sue on behalf of a larger group of persons, referred to as “the class”. However, the Indian version will not allow individuals to sue on behalf of a larger group, but will empower an authority to make rulings applicable to larger groups.

The new rules will incorporate a product liability clause to recall items that are unsafe and hazardous.

India to get own version of class action lawsuits
The new rules will incorporate a product liability clause to recall items that are unsafe and hazardous. (Representative image)

An informal group of ministers has cleared a proposal to establish a consumer protection authority, which will have the power to order recall of such items or recommend action against the companies to existing sector-specific regulators, and incorporate fresh provisions to make the grievance redress mechanism more consumer-friendly.

As per the proposal, the companies/producers would also have to pay compensation for damage to the consumers. TOI in November had first reported the proposal to set up consumer protection authority with sweeping powers, including taking up cases suo motu besides those referred to the agency. Moreover, it can investigate the cases and order action.

Sources said finance minister Arun Jaitley, who is heading the inter-ministerial group, has suggested to the consumer affairs ministry that to avoid any overlap among independent regulators, the proposed consumer protection authority should refer investigation report to the sector-specific regulator like Food Safety and Standards Authority (FSSAI), Competition Commission of India (CCI) for packaged food items and the proposed Vehicle Regulation and Road Safety Authority of India for issues relating to the automobile sector.

Consumer affairs minister Ram Vilas Paswan said many new suggestions have been made to make the law more consumer-friendly. Jaitley has suggested that consumers should be allowed to argue their case at every level irrespective of the amount. “He (Jaitley) has suggested it should be on the lines of civil procedure code (CPC) where a complainant can argue his case even up to the Supreme Court. The proposal floated by the consumer affairs ministry was not to allow advocates in cases involving an amount less than Rs 20 lakh,” said a source.

TOI has learnt that the FM has also asked the ministry to include a provision where affidavit by a witness should be treated as enough evidence to avoid harassment of consumers. A provision will now be added minimizing cross examination. Similarly, the number of appeals will also be restricted to two.

Paswan said the informal GoM will meet again next week to finalize the bill.

“The consumer protection authority will fill the gap, which is missing now to deal with unfair trade practices except those covered under the CCI Act. The authority can conduct search, seizure of documents, articles and records. It can also summon delinquent manufacturers and advertisers and order withdrawal of false or misleading advertisements. It can also impose administrative fine on those found violating the law,” said a government official.

Food inspectors deny recall of Maggi noodles

NEW DELHI: The Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) has denied ordering recall of any batch of Magginoodles. The Central food safety regulator said that it is waiting to examine the initial report from the state enforcement agencies in Uttar Pradesh which found the product containing added monosodium glutamate (MSG) and lead in excess of the permissible limit.

“We have not yet ordered any recall. We are waiting to see the report from UP and may order countrywide sampling after that,” a senior official in the FSSAI told TOI.

When contacted, Nestle spokesperson also confirmed that the company has not received any communication from the regulator seeking countrywide recall.

maggiS

“We have not yet ordered any recall. We are waiting to see the report from UP and may order countrywide sampling after that,” a senior official in the FSSAI told TOI.
This came in the wake of some news reports saying food inspectors have ordered Nestle India to recall a batch of Maggi noodles from shops across the country.

Last week, TOI had reported that the 2-minute noodles has come under regulatory scanner after samples collected in some parts of Uttar Pradesh were found containing added MSG and lead in excess of the permissible limit. The Lucknow Food Safety and Drug Administration (FSDA) had initiated inquiry and written to the FSSAI in New Delhi seeking to cancel the licence for Maggi.

UP FSDA assistant commissioner Vijay Bahadur Yadav said the final report of the investigation is yet to come and a recall of the product can be ordered only after confirmatory reports are examined.

Initial sampling of Maggi noodles and test results in UP showed the product containing 17 parts per million lead, whereas the permissible limit is 0.01ppm. Nestle says its records show lead content is negligible and less than 1 % of the fixed limit.

Monosodium glutamate, a kind of amino acid which occurs naturally in many agricultural products, is often also added artificially to packaged food to enhance flavour. Regulators and experts say such additives can be harmful for health, mainly for children. Food safety regulations mandate companies to specify on the packaging if MSG has been added.

Fortified foods reaching new heights!

Fortified foods reaching new heights!

In order to showcase India’s progress in the last 5 years in the area of nutrition for the masses, a symposium, aptly entitled “Food Fortification in Rajasthan: Enriching Foods, Enriching Lives” was organized in Jaipur, Rajasthan on May 4, 2015 by the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) in collaboration with the Indian Institute of Health Management Research (IIHMR). Almost 70% of Indian women and girls suffer from iron deficiency anemia. Other micronutrient deficiencies like vitamin A, vitamin D, zinc, vitamin B12, iodine, folic acid, vitamin B2 etc, are also present. The dietary deficiencies of vitamins A & D and folate have been highlighted by recent studies carried out by the National Nutrition Monitoring Bureau (NNMB) and the National Sample Survey Organization (NSSO).

The deficiencies were far below the recommended dietary allowance (RDA). Moreover, maternal malnutrition is the single-most important cause of low birth weight (LBW) babies (<2.5kg) in India. Therefore, fortified foods, which contain these nutrients will go a long way in making up the deficiency. Importantly, staple foods like wheat flour, milk and edible oil can be fortified so that the whole population of India can benefit.

GAIN’s Country Manager has indicated that since Indians have a high level of micronutrient deficiency, there was an urgent need to address this problem, and that supplying fortified food could be a feasible solution. He suggested that initiating public-private-partnerships (PPP) in the area of food fortification would bring in both the private and government players to address the issue of micronutrient deficiency in a holistic manner. GAIN’s efforts have been in the area of large scale food fortification (LSFF) in the states of Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh. It has been working to improve the quality of the mid-day meal system in schools, as well as the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS).

Importantly, over 540,000 metric tons (MT) of milk, 500,000 MT of edible oil and 360,000 MT of wheat flour is being fortified in MP and Rajasthan for 90 million people every year. The Executive Director of GAIN stressed that safe food was a basic human right, and that it was necessary that food is produced, processed and marketed in a safe manner so that only the best product reaches the consumer. He further added that GAIN was striving to deliver quality food in order to build stronger communities and economies, and he was optimistic that malnutrition could be eliminated in the near future.

The President of IIHMR has indicated that Rajasthan government in its budget has allocated fortified food for distribution through the public distribution system (PDS). He further added that IIHMR’s collaboration with GAIN for over 4 decades has reached out to various industries that now produce 2,40,000 MT of fortified edible oil annually, 5 lakh MT of fortified milk annually, and 1 lakh MT of fortified wheat flour annually that has reached over 1 million children daily through the centralized kitchens. This has addressed the issues of micronutrient malnutrition in the state to a large extent. Food fortification is very cost-effective. It costs just Rs. 0.05 – Rs. 0.10 to fortify 1kg of wheat flour or edible oil, and Rs. 0.02 per kg of milk. Therefore, food fortification has the potential to improve the quality of life for both children and adults, and all that is required is to harness the potential of fortified food, implement it and scale it up, in order to improve the life of millions.

Withdraw The Batch of Maggi Noodles: UP FDA to Nestle,Recalling difficult, says Maggi after FDA order

NEW DELHI:

Nestle India has been asked to withdraw a batch of popular snack Maggi noodles from the market after it was found to contain high level of lead, Uttar Pradesh Food Safety and Drug Administration officials said.

While a company spokesperson did not reply to repeated calls and emails queries sent for comments in this regard, UP FDA officials said the order pertained to a 2014 batch of Maggi noodles. Confirming the order asking Nestle to recall a batch of Maggi noodles, Additional Commissioner Ram Arya Maurya said, “Whatever action we had to take we have taken. I don’t wish to say anything more.”

Tests of the said batch had also reportedly found high levels of added monosodium glutamate (MSG), a taste enhancer, in the noodles.

Sources close to the company said Nestle has contested the findings and said subsequent batches have passed all the tests. They also contested the conclusion based on testing of just “one pack” of Maggi noodles.

Nestle India, a subsidiary of Swiss conglomerate Nestle SA sells instant noodle, ketchups, sauces under the Maggi brand. It has around 60 per cent market share in the instant noodle category

Recalling difficult, says Maggi after FDA order

Maggi noodles off the shelves in 2 days

Food inspectors have ordered Nestle India to recall a batch of Maggi noodles from shops across the country, saying the product contained dangerous levels of lead.

The Food Safety and Drug Administration (FDA) in Uttar Pradesh said high lead content was found during routine tests on two dozen packets of instant noodles, manufactured by Nestle in India

Two FDA officials said all the packets of instant noodles tested in the state-run laboratory were contaminated. They found a lead concentration of 17.2 parts per million (ppm), nearly seven times the permissible limit. The FDA officials said the acceptable limit of lead ranges between 0.01 ppm and 2.5 ppm.

The scientists also found high levels of added monosodium glutamate (MSG), a taste enhancer, in the noodles.

“Maggi instant noodles contained dangerous amount of lead and MSG. We had to immediately issue orders against the company,” D.G. Srivastava, deputy inspector general of the FDA in Lucknow, capital of Uttar Pradesh, told Reuters

மேகி நூடுல்சுக்கு விரைவில் தடை? – படிப்பு மற்றும் நடத்தையில் பாதிப்பை உருவாக்கும் உப்பு இருப்பது கண்டுபிடிப்பு

புதுடெல்லி, மே 20-

குழந்தைகள் விரும்பி சாப்பிடும் மேகி நூடுல்சில் கற்றல், நடத்தையில் பாதிப்பை உருவாக்கும் எம்.எஸ்.ஜி. என்ற மோனோசோடியம் குளுட்டோமேட் அனுமதிக்கப்பட்ட அளவை விட அதிகம் இருப்பதாக அதிர்ச்சி தகவல் வெளியாகியுள்ளது.

உத்திரப்பிரதேசத்தில் நடத்தப்பட்ட ஆய்வில் இவ்விவரம் தெரியவந்ததை அடுத்து விரைவில் அதன் விற்பனைக்கு தடை விதிக்கப்படும் என கூறப்படுகிறது. உணவின் ருசியை அதிகரிக்க மோனோசோடியம் குளுட்டோமேட் என்ற சோடியம் உப்பு சேர்க்கப்படுகிறது. ஆனால் மிக குறைந்த அளவு மட்டுமே சேர்க்க அனுமதிக்கப்பட்டுள்ளது. எம்.எஸ்.ஜி. 0.01 ppm அளவுக்கு உப்பு அனுமதிக்கப்பட்ட நிலையில், லக்னோ உணவு பாதுகாப்பு மற்றும் மருந்து நிர்வாக துறை நடத்திய ஆய்வில் எம்.எஸ்.ஜி. அளவானது 17 ppm இருப்பதாக கண்டறியப்பட்டுள்ளது. இதனை தொடர்ந்து விரைவில் உ.பி.யில் மேகிக்கு தடை விதிக்கப்படலாம் என தெரிகிறது.

அதிகளவு எம்.எஸ்.ஜி. உடலில் சேரும்போது கற்றல் திறன், இயல்பான நடத்தை ஆகியவற்றில் பாதிப்பை ஏற்படுத்துவதுடன் தொடர்ந்து அதே உணவை சாப்பிடும் வகையில் மனித உடல் அதற்கு அடிமையாகிவிடும் வாய்ப்புள்ளது.

இதுபற்றி கருத்து தெரிவித்துள்ள அந்த நிறுவனத்தின் செய்தி தொடர்பாளர் “எங்கள் ஆய்வகங்களில் நடத்தப்பட்ட ஆய்வுகளில் அனுமதிக்கப்பட்ட அளவிற்குள்ளாகதான் எம்.எஸ்.ஜி. இருக்கின்றது” என கூறியுள்ளார். இதே நிறுவனம் தான் கைக்குழந்தைகள் முதல் சிறுவர்கள் வரை கொடுக்கப்படும் ஊட்ட உணவுகளையும் தயாரித்து விற்பனை செய்கிறது என்பது குறிப்பிடத்தக்கது.

KOLLAM:For thousands of youth in the state, taking up the job of a Food Safety Officer (FSO) is turning out to be a daunting task. Those who pin their hopes on this field-level job at the Food Safety Commissionerate are slowly realising that their dream is fading day-by- day as the tug of war between PSC and the Health Department is slowing down the recruitment process. The Commissionerate, since its inception, is yet to recruit field-level officers through PSC. According to sources, there are around 82 FSO posts to be filled through PSC. Though the Commissionerate submitted papers with the PSC for reporting the vacancies on September 2014, it was returned by the latter mentioning that confusion prevails over the educational qualification of candidates. Express, which reported about the matter then, was told by the officials that it was an ‘infinitesimal error’ and would be resolved soon. It seems that the imbroglio is not going to end soon as the file regarding eligibility, age and experience for FSO posts was returned by the PSC for the second time, seeking clarification regarding ‘training’. A word in this regard came into light through an RTI filed by a member of the Kerala Food Technologists Association (KEFTA), an organisation which persistently works towards pressurising the government for notifying the FSO posts. In reply to the RTI filed on February 12, the PSC informed that it had demanded a clarification from the government regarding ‘training’ which is listed under the head of ‘qualification’ on the GO (MS) No. 287/2014, H & FWD, dated September 26, 2014. It also added that once it is received the notification process would be speeded up. When Express inquired about this matter with the PSC’s recruitment wing, they said that they were yet to receive clarification from the government. They also added that the matter is now pending with the Health Department. Murky Deal Meanwhile, the repeated mistakes and confusions which crept into the file regarding appointment of FSO posts is being viewed suspiciously by a section of officers within the Food Safety Commissionerate. One of the officers, who requested anonymity, told Express that some quarters within the Commissionerate are against reporting vacancies to PSC and the unwanted delay could be their brainwork. “It seems that a nexus is there in function, which continuously blocks the plan of new appointments. They favour deputation from the Health Department. The chances of sneaking is high if delay continues,” said the official. The official also said that though it was Kerala which first established the Commissionerate of Food Safety to implement the Food Safety and Standards Act (FSSA), it still staggers behind other states when it comes to enforcement. Youth who aspire to become FSO allege that each time the recruitment-related papers enter the final lap, there is something which pulls it back from the finishing point. They also added that it could be the delaying tactics of government to appease a minority. “It’s a disheartening factor that the government compromises with the implementation of the Act. Often the enforcement is limited to checking at eateries. A larger part is yet to be monitored. A number of field level officers are not well-versed In the areas which come under the FSSA, such as packaging. This could only be overcome through fresh faces as they are technically and educationally sound than the existing ones,” said Jaffar, state general secretary of KEFTA. The organisation also alleges that the assurance of Health Minister V S Sivakumar in the Assembly, in June 2014, that Food Safety Offices would be made functional at 140 Assembly constituencies in the state turns out to be a false one as majority of these offices are yet to function owing to lack of FSOs. At a time when the state market is being flooded with vegetables having high pesticide residues and where grave health risk is guaranteed, these youth point out that action is needed more than lip service. Otherwise, the delay would cost the state dearly. Source:http://www.newindianexpress.com/states/kerala/FSO-Postings-PSC-Health-Dept-Tiff-Causing-Delay/2015/04/28/article2786458.ece Email This BlogThis! Share to Twitter Share to Facebook No comments: Post a Comment Newer Post Older Post Home Search This Blog Total Pageviews 38363 Blog Archive ▼ 2015 (18) ► May (2) ▼ April (11) FSO – PSC Notification പലചരക്കു വ്യാപാരികള്‍ക്കെതിരെ ഇറക്കിയ സര്‍ക്കുലര്‍… Authorities need more teeth to ensure safe food FSO Postings: PSC-Health Dept Tiff Causing Delay Hotels demand fines back HC Judgement on compounding fee- Manorama online പഴകിയ ഭക്ഷണ സാധനങ്ങള്‍ക്ക് രൂപമാറ്റം വരുത്തി വില്‍… സര്‍ക്കാറിന്റെ വാക്ക് പാഴായി; ജനം ഇപ്പോഴും വിഷംതീ… Work of food safety wing lauded റദ്ദാക്കിയ പിഴത്തുക തിരിച്ചു നല്‍കണം – ഹോട്ടല്‍ – … Hoteliers to move court seeking return of fine ► March (2) ► January (3) ► 2014 (85) ► 2013 (236) ► 2012 (397) ► 2011 (119) Popular Posts Qualification and method of appointment of Food Safety Officers-Orders Issued – Kerala Tamil Nadu Public Health act 1939 (chapter 12, Food control)repealed Seniority list of Food Safety Officers- Kerala ഭക്ഷ്യവസ്തുക്കളുടെ വില്‍പനയ്ക്ക് ലൈസന്‍സ് അടിച്ചേല്‍പ്പിക്കരുത്‌ Corrupt FSOs responsible for extended licensing, registration deadline പി.എഫ്.എ ആക്ട് റദ്ദായത് എന്ന് ? Adulterated Food – The FDA Is The Problem US FDA Followers

KOLLAM:For thousands of youth in the state, taking up the job of a Food Safety Officer (FSO) is turning out to be a daunting task.
Those who pin their hopes on this field-level job at the Food Safety Commissionerate are slowly realising that their dream is fading day-by- day as the tug of war between PSC and the Health Department is slowing down the recruitment process. The Commissionerate, since its inception, is yet to recruit field-level officers through PSC.
According to sources, there are around 82 FSO posts to be filled through PSC. Though the Commissionerate submitted papers with the PSC for reporting the vacancies on September 2014, it was returned by the latter mentioning that confusion prevails over the educational qualification of candidates. Express, which reported about the matter then, was told by the officials that it was an ‘infinitesimal error’ and would be resolved soon.
It seems that the imbroglio is not going to end soon as the file regarding eligibility, age and experience for FSO posts was returned by the PSC for the second time, seeking clarification regarding ‘training’.
A word in this regard came into light through an RTI filed by a member of the Kerala Food Technologists Association (KEFTA), an organisation which persistently works towards pressurising the government for notifying the FSO posts.  In reply to the RTI filed on February 12, the PSC informed that it had demanded a clarification from the government regarding ‘training’ which is listed under the head of ‘qualification’ on the GO (MS) No. 287/2014, H & FWD, dated September 26, 2014. It also added that once it is received the notification process would be speeded up.
When Express inquired about this matter with the PSC’s recruitment wing, they said that they were yet to receive clarification from the government. They also added that the matter is now pending with the Health Department.
Murky Deal
Meanwhile, the repeated mistakes and confusions which crept into the file regarding appointment of FSO posts is being viewed suspiciously by a section of officers within the Food Safety Commissionerate. One of the officers, who requested anonymity, told Express that some quarters within the Commissionerate are against reporting vacancies to PSC and the unwanted delay could be their brainwork. “It seems that a nexus is there in function, which continuously blocks the plan of new appointments. They favour deputation from the Health Department. The chances of sneaking is high if delay continues,” said the official.
The official also said that though it was Kerala which first established the Commissionerate of Food Safety to implement the Food Safety and Standards Act (FSSA), it still staggers behind other states when it comes to enforcement. Youth who aspire to become FSO allege that each time the recruitment-related papers enter the final lap, there is something which pulls it back from the finishing point. They also added that it could be the delaying tactics of government to appease a minority.
“It’s a disheartening factor that the government compromises with the implementation of the Act. Often the enforcement is limited to checking at eateries. A larger part is yet to be monitored. A number of field level officers are not well-versed In the areas which come under the FSSA, such as packaging.
This could only be overcome through fresh faces as they are technically and educationally sound than the existing ones,” said Jaffar, state general secretary of KEFTA. The organisation also alleges that the assurance of Health Minister V S Sivakumar in the Assembly, in June 2014, that Food Safety Offices would be made functional at 140 Assembly constituencies in the state turns out to be a false one as majority of these offices are yet to function owing to lack of FSOs.
At a time when the state market is being flooded with vegetables having high pesticide residues and where grave health risk is  guaranteed, these youth point out that action is needed more than lip service. Otherwise, the delay would cost the state dearly.
Source:http://www.newindianexpress.com/states/kerala/FSO-Postings-PSC-Health-Dept-Tiff-Causing-Delay/2015/04/28/article2786458.ece